Richard Cooper

Jun 232016
 

robbieOliver joins the group undertaking a project searching for trends and correlations between crystal structure similarity and molecular similarity. He will also attempt to extend his analysis to co-crystal formation rules for which he will undertake and analyse a significant number of combinatorial experiments.

Outside work he spends much of his free time at the bank in his role as treasurer of various adventurous University societies including caving, orienteering and scuba diving.

Jun 232016
 

katieKatie is investigating crystallisation properties of different classes of materials. The results will be compared with crystallisability predictions carried out as part of Jerome Wicker‘s Part II and DPhil research, and previous measurement of molecular crystallisation properties.

Katie undertook rapid prototyping of her crystallisation apparatus using Lego, LEDs, plenty of solder and a Raspberry Pi computer. After work she enjoys her role as Safety Officer of the University pistol club.

Jun 232016
 

baker16Jo is investigating crystalline materials which undergo light-induced changes in the solid-state. We will make use of these materials as model systems for in situ tracking by diffraction of conformational changes and reactions which can be triggered by external stimuli.

Apr 082016
 

group16The 2016 British Crystallographic Meeting Spring Meeting took place at the University of Nottingham from 4th – 7th April. Contributions from Chem. Cryst. staff and students were:

Jerome G. P. Wicker, Bill I. F. David & Richard I. Cooper
When will it Crystallise? (Talk in session: From Amorphous to Crystal)

Jo Baker & Richard I. Cooper
Making and Measuring Photoswitchable Materials (Talk in session: Young Crystallographers’ Satellite)

Pascal Parois, Karim J. Sutton & Richard I. Cooper
On the application of leverage analysis to parameter precision using area detector strategies (Poster)

Oliver Robshaw & Richard I. Cooper
The role of molecular similarity in crystal structure packing (Poster)

Katie McInally & Richard I. Cooper
Linking crystallization prediction, theory and experiment using solubility curve determination (Poster)

Richard I. Cooper, Pascal Parois & David J. Watkin
Non-routine single crystal structure analyses using CRYSTALS (Poster)

Alex Mercer & Richard I. Cooper
Fitting Disordered Crystal Structures by Simulated Annealing of an Ensemble Model (Poster)

 

Apr 022016
 

wombatThe 30th biennial conference of the Society of Crystallographers of Australia and New Zealand (Crystal30) was held in Hobart, Tasmania in March 2016.
Richard Cooper gave a keynote entitled “Routine problems and non-routine solutions in single crystal structure analyses” in which he discussed the use of the CRYSTALS software (and other tools) to address commonly occurring problems in crystallographic analysis.

Mar 072016
 

Acta. Cryst. (2016) C72, 261-267 [ doi:10.1107/S2053229616003570 ]

snipA study of post-refinement absolute structure determination using previously published data was carried out using the CRYSTALS software package. We show that absolute structure determination may be carried out optimally using the analyses available in CRYSTALS, and that it is not necessary to have the separate procedures absolute structure determination and no inter­est in absolute structure as proposed by Flack [Chimia (2014), 68, 26–30].

Publisher’s copy

Dec 232015
 

ecrislaThe 3rd Edition of the School of Crystallisation and Crystallography for Latin America organised by Prof. Carlos Campos was held in December in Florianópolis, Brazil. The quiet setting in a monastery south of the main centre of Florianópolis provided ideal conditions for an intensive week of crystallography lectures, posters and discussions. Richard Cooper attended to lecture on crystallographic modelling and structure solution methods.

May 302015
 

ccChemistry Central Journal 2015, 9:30 [ doi:10.1186/s13065-015-0105-4 ]

The size and complexity of molecules being studied by single crystal diffraction is growing year by year, resulting in an increase in the difficulties encountered during structure determination. From the crystallisation itself and sample handling, to structure solution and refinement, specific problems due to larger molecules are discussed.

During refinement, several methods are available to deal with the problems encountered with large structures within the software CRYSTALS. Recent developments in precision and speed during the least squares in CRYSTALS is helping the structural scientist to deal with larger structures more efficiently.

Publisher’s copy (Open Access)