Amber L. Thompson

Mar 162011
 

Terry worked for the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell for many years before he joined Chem. Cryst.

Terry was one of the pioneers of the use of neutron scattering in the United Kingdom and a founder member of the BCA.  Although interested in many areas of crystallography, his particular specialities are neutron scattering studies of crystal structures and lattice dynamics of inorganic materials. Recent interests are the determination of the crystal structures of the oxides of uranium and the nature of the phase transitions in U4O9. The oxide studies are undertaken in collaboration with Frederico Garrido of the University of Paris, Lech Nowicki of the Soltan Institute of Nuclear Physics, Warsaw and Alberto Albinati of the University of Milan.

The author of a number of highly regarded books, there is a prize awarded in his honour sponsored by the Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Mar 162011
 

Emma’s research is focussed on developing a better understanding of the solid state.  She is using a three pronged attack, studying the crystallisation of chalcones; examining the effect of temperature on a material that undergoes a phase transition, and investigating the World’s Favourite Space Group, P21/c.  She is using a wide range of probes, including the Cambridge Structural Database, dSNAP, Laue Diffraction, Solid State NMR and Variable Temperature Single Crystal Diffraction as well as collecting data at Diamond.  When not fighting to grow crystals or preparing dinner for the team at Diamond, she enjoys dancing, but refuses to perform for the group.

Mar 162011
 

Jeremy’s research revolves around using various techniques (NMR, crystallography and DFT calculations) to provide information about exactly where hydrogen atoms are located in crystal structures, and exploring the merits and shortcomings of the various techniques for this purpose. When he isn’t trying to persuade a supercomputer to calculate what he wants, he enjoys playing the trumpet with the Oxford University Big Band, plays squash and designs prize-winning posters.

Mar 162011
 

As part of Age Concern, an EPSRC-funded exploration into the world of modern crystallography, Dave is developing a fast, live, configurable chemical structure matching algorithm to identify discrepancies between an expected structure and a real crystallographic structure. Implemented in his software “matchbOx”, Dave is augmenting the software capabilities to automatically handle certain cases of crystal disorder, whilst enjoying the best music the 80s has to offer. When not advancing the boundaries of science, Dave enjoys weight-training, making music and working on pet programming projects.

Mar 162011
 

Mr. Keith R. J. WatersKeith is our part time X-ray technician.  He has responsibility for initial Health and Safety training as well as basic instrument and infrastructure maintenance.  In his spare time he works in the IT Support team.

Feb 152011
 

CrystEngComm (2011), 13(8) 2923-2929.    [ doi:10.1039/c0ce00709a ]

A series of racemic or stereochemically labile chiral borate anions based on the 2,20-biphenol motif was
investigated. All borates were homochiral in the solid state, although in some cases the heterochiral
diastereomers were computed to be thermodynamically preferred (DFT). The crystallographic
preference for the homochiral diastereomer was attributed to its lower bulk, higher molecular
symmetry, and the therewith associated better packing ability.

Feb 012011
 

Presented by:  Dr. Andrew D. Schwarz & Liban M. A. Saleh
Research Leader:  Prof. Philip Mountford & Prof. Simon Aldridge
Published:  Journal of the American Chemical Society

Transition-metal boryl compounds (L)M(BX2)x, containing 2‑center, 2‑electron σ‑bonds have been a topic of outstanding interest due to pivotal roles in a variety of catalytic and stoichiometric transformations, e.g. hydroboration and diboration of C–C π-bonds, and functionalization of alkane and arene C‑H bonds. To date, virtually all boryl complexes have been prepared either by B‑X (X = H or halogen) or B‑B oxidative addition to a low oxidation state (L)M species, or by nucleophilic attack of a [(L)M]‑ anion on a XBR2 or related source of the boryl moiety. However, utilisation of the nucleophilic Li{B(NArCH)2}(THF)2 (Ar = 2,6‑C6H3iPr2), allows access to rare earth metal boryl compounds.  Data were collected on a small colourless crystal (0.05 × 0.05 × 0.05 mm) using the new Oxford Diffraction (Agilent) SuperNova diffractometers and copper radiation.

Structure of the Month - February 2011

Structure of the Month – February 2011